Why learn German Language

Are you still confused , whether you should learn German or any foreign language ?

Here we present top 5 reasons, why this is the high time for you to learn German.

1. German is the gateway to a world-class higher education.

One of the reasons why German has such a high standing in the science community is the fact that Germany’s universities have an excellent international reputation. In the year 2011 ,the country was the fourth most popular destination for students from abroad with more than a quarter million foreigners being enrolled in German schools. What’s more, the German system for higher education boasts a number of universities with a very low or non-existent tuition fee. No wonder scholars and researchers are flocking there! Learning German to save on student debt sounds like a pretty good return of investment.

2. Knowing German creates job and business opportunities.

Germany’s economic strength equals business opportunities. Multinational business opportunities exist throughout the European Union and in the Eastern European countries, where German is the second most spoken language after Russian. Companies like BMW, Daimler, Siemens, Lufthansa, SAP, Bosch, Infineon, BASF, and many others need international partners. The Japanese, who have the 2nd most powerful economy in the world, understand the business advantages that a knowledge of German will bring them: 68% of Japanese students study German. If you’re looking for employment in the United States, knowing German can give you great advantages. German companies account for 700,000 jobs in the United States, and US companies have created approximately the same number of jobs in Germany. All other things being equal, the job candidate with German skills will trump the one without such skills every time. Most surveyed companies in the United States would choose someone with German literacy over an equally qualified candidate.

3. German is the language of inventors and innovators

It is said that Germany is the country of poets and thinkers – Das Land der Dichter und Denker. There is definitely no denying the second part. A large percentage of the world’s most impressive achievements were first conceived of in German. Over one hundred Nobel Prizes have gone to brilliant Germans for accomplishments in physics, medicine, chemistry, literature and other areas. That is not even counting the prizes awarded to people from the other two major German-speaking countries Austria and Switzerland. Plus, many of the recipients from other nations received their training at German universities. So if you are looking to add a Nobel Prize to your resume, learning German might not be a bad place to start. Perhaps you have slightly lower goals, and are just looking to absorb some of this genius by reading famous publications in their native language.

4. Studying a new culture helps you meet new and interesting people.

A research showed that people at the age of 50 or 60+ regret that if they would have studied a foreign language. Foreign language study will completely chance your traveling experience. Foreign languages open the door to art, music, dance, fashion, cuisine, film, philosophy, science. Foreign languages expand one’s world view and limit the barriers between people: barriers cause distrust and fear. Foreign language study enhances listening skills and memory. International travel is made easier and more pleasant through knowing a foreign language.

5. Germany has the 3rd strongest economy and is the #1 export nation in the world.

Germany has the third largest economy in the world and is the economic powerhouse of the European Union. In 2007 – for the 5th year in a row and despite the strength of the euro currency – the Germans were world champions in exports. The country exported 940 billion US dollars worth of goods, just ahead of the US exports. From cars to machinery and industrial equipment, from pharmaceuticals to household goods, German businesses earn 1 in 3 euros through export, and 1 in 4 jobs depends on exports. The competitiveness and desirability of German products on the market are indicated by the country’s substantial trade surplus, which reached 162 billion euros (209 billion dollars) in 2006 and continues to grow every year.

And don’t forget that Switzerland, another German-speaking country, has one of the highest standards of living in the world.

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